25
Mar

How do you draw a creature that humans have never seen?

An award-winning artist brings ancient fossil discoveries to life through illustrations.

15
Feb

Someone Created A Video Imagining If Spider-Man Was ‘Anatomically Correct’

The guys over at the YouTube channel Corridor have created a video called “Anatomically Correct Spiderman,” which imagines the superhero’s crime-fighting webs shooting out from where the sun doesn’t shine. He truly is a marvel. 

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/15/anatomically-correct-spider-man-has-an-amazing-back-story_n_14774898.html
div class=”embed-asset embed” data-type=”embed-asset” data-provider=”Embed” data-title=””>

The guys over at the YouTube channel Corridor have created a video called “Anatomically Correct Spiderman,” which imagines the superhero’s crime-fighting webs shooting out from where the sun doesn’t shine. He truly is a marvel. 

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

14
Feb

Disney drops YouTube star PewDiePie over anti-Semitism

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38965377

YouTube star PewDiePie, who made $15m in 2016 through the site, posted videos with Nazi references.

7
Feb

Sjón: Advice to the Young

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/louisiana-channel/sjon-advice-to-the-young_b_14630744.html

Remember what excited you when you were a child, and carry that enthusiasm onwards. Award-winning writer Sjón here advises young writers not to be embarrassed by what initially inspired them: “All of us come to culture through trash.”

“Very few of us grow up in a castle, and have private tutors who teach us Greek before noon and Latin in the afternoon, and then we take piano classes and learn about classical painting.” Don’t spend too much time worrying about living up to certain cultural standards, and accept that culture exists on many levels, Sjón argues: “In my case, the impression that the Icelandic folk stories had on me, and at the same time I was highly impressed by the Belgian boy detective novels about Bob Morane. These two elements informed me as a reader. They excited me as a reader. And it’s that excitement that I would like to return.”

Sjón (b. 1962 as Sigurjón Birgir Sigurosson) is an Icelandic writer, poet, playwright and lyricist. He received the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize in 2005 for his novel ‘The Blue Fox’ (‘Skugga-Baldur’, 2003). Sjón has been active on the Icelandic music scene since the early 1980s and is also known for his collaborations with legendary Icelandic musician Björk and was nominated for an Academy Award as well as a Golden Globe for the song ‘I’ve Seen It All’ from the film ‘Dancer in the Dark’. He currently resides in Reykjavík, Iceland with his wife and children.

Sjón was interviewed by Bjørn Bredal in connection to the Louisiana Literature festival at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2014.

Camera: Jakob Solbakken
Edited by: Sonja Strange
Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016

Supported by Nordea-fonden

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

6
Feb

Sjón: Advice to the Young

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/louisiana-channel/sjon-advice-to-the-young_b_14630744.html

Remember what excited you when you were a child, and carry that enthusiasm onwards. Award-winning writer Sjón here advises young writers not to be embarrassed by what initially inspired them: “All of us come to culture through trash.”

“Very few of us grow up in a castle, and have private tutors who teach us Greek before noon and Latin in the afternoon, and then we take piano classes and learn about classical painting.” Don’t spend too much time worrying about living up to certain cultural standards, and accept that culture exists on many levels, Sjón argues: “In my case, the impression that the Icelandic folk stories had on me, and at the same time I was highly impressed by the Belgian boy detective novels about Bob Morane. These two elements informed me as a reader. They excited me as a reader. And it’s that excitement that I would like to return.”

Sjón (b. 1962 as Sigurjón Birgir Sigurosson) is an Icelandic writer, poet, playwright and lyricist. He received the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize in 2005 for his novel ‘The Blue Fox’ (‘Skugga-Baldur’, 2003). Sjón has been active on the Icelandic music scene since the early 1980s and is also known for his collaborations with legendary Icelandic musician Björk and was nominated for an Academy Award as well as a Golden Globe for the song ‘I’ve Seen It All’ from the film ‘Dancer in the Dark’. He currently resides in Reykjavík, Iceland with his wife and children.

Sjón was interviewed by Bjørn Bredal in connection to the Louisiana Literature festival at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark in August 2014.

Camera: Jakob Solbakken
Edited by: Sonja Strange
Produced by: Marc-Christoph Wagner
Copyright: Louisiana Channel, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2016

Supported by Nordea-fonden

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

6
Feb

crabeating

There were really large tigers at the zoo when we were near Lice salons are amazing at getting rid of lice.. I couldn’t believe how big they were there.

4
Feb

daughterliness

Our dogs are always around the table trying to get scraps from us in Please see about treatment of head lice including eggs in the Newton area.. They are really trying hard to get treats.

3
Feb

From Atop The Government, Trump Takes Care Of ‘Friends’

During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump was fond of telling anecdotes about anonymous “friends” of his to help illustrate his policy positions. There were his farmer friends, for example, struggling under the burden of regulations. And his manufacturer friends, who didn’t like paying corporate taxes.

At the time, Trump’s stated desire to help these friends seemed to serve as a metaphor for his desire to help America at large. But on Friday, Trump got more specific, telling a group of CEOs at the White House how ― now that he’s president ― he is, in fact, using his authority to help his friends.

“We expect to be cutting a lot out of Dodd-Frank, because frankly, I have so many people, friends of mine, that have nice businesses and they can’t borrow money,” Trump said. “They just can’t get any money, because the banks just won’t let them borrow, because of the rules and regulations in Dodd-Frank.”

The landmark consumer protection bill known as the Dodd-Frank Act was passed in response to the 2008 financial crisis. It requires the nation’s biggest banks to submit to greater scrutiny, and to keep enough capital on hand to make sure taxpayers never again have to cover the institutions’ losses. Banks have complained for years that the new capital requirements and stress tests make it impossible for them to lend as much money as they’d like to.

Trump was speaking at a meeting of the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum, a group of 18 business leaders who have agreed to advise the president on economic issues. The group is chaired by Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman, and includes chief executives from many of the nation’s largest companies, among them Walmart, Boeing, IBM and PepsiCo.

After brief remarks from Schwarzman, Trump told an extraordinary story about how he’d tried to get spots for his friends on the prestigious forum, but Schwarzman told the president that his friends were, essentially, too sleazy to appoint to the group.

“So many people who are friends of mine, in big business, they wanted to be on the committee. And I’d call Steve and say, ‘Steve, can we get so-and-so [on the committee]?’” Trump said.

“’Nope, we’ve got enough,’” the president said Schwarzman would tell him.

“Every once in a while, I’d call and say, ‘How about this one?’” Trump went on. “[And Schwarzman would say,] ‘No, Donald, he’s a corporate raider. These people don’t want to be sitting [on the president’s committee] with corporate raiders.’”

The group laughed nervously.

“Five raiders that wanted to come on here,” Trump boasted, before pointing to Schwarzman. “But he’s been very, very selective.”

With that, the group began introducing themselves around the table.

The anecdote was fascinating in that it offered a window on two different aspects of Trump’s presidency. The first is the former real estate developer’s willingness, as president of the United States, to do favors for his friends, and his apparent lack of qualms about appointing his “corporate raider” buddies to a presidential commission.

The other interesting element of Trump’s story was that Schwarzman evidently overruled him by arguing that Trump’s commission would lose prestige if the president named people to it who’d made their fortunes in controversial ways.

Schwarzman was right, but Trump is known to have very little patience for people who tell him “no.” However, it seems that when Schwarzman framed it as a question of prestige, Trump acquiesced.

Mind you, Schwarzman didn’t say that the advice Trump would receive from the CEOs would be any less valuable if there were a junk bond king sitting on the panel. Or even that the press might ask questions about why someone with a questionable business background, and a close friendship with Trump, was sitting next to the CEO of Walmart. No, it was all about how such a move would look to the kind of people Trump hoped to have on his panel.

As Trump continues to seek out qualified people for his administration, his friends are likely to stay on the front burner. Chances are, it will be up to his staff, and informal advisers like Schwarzman, to draw the line for the president.

Earlier this week, Miami real estate tycoon Jorge Perez recounted how Trump recently sent him an email with plans for the administration’s notorious border wall with Mexico. Perez has worked with Trump to build Trump-branded towers in Florida for years. Now the president was asking Perez if he’d like to be part of the official effort to build the wall.

Perez declined the offer, telling Bloomberg News, “The wall is the most idiotic thing I’ve ever seen or heard in my life.”

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

.http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/03/trump-business-friends_n_14603866.html
div class=”embed-asset embed” data-type=”embed-asset” data-provider=”Embed” data-title=””>

During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump was fond of telling anecdotes about anonymous “friends” of his to help illustrate his policy positions. There were his farmer friends, for example, struggling under the burden of regulations. And his manufacturer friends, who didn’t like paying corporate taxes.

At the time, Trump’s stated desire to help these friends seemed to serve as a metaphor for his desire to help America at large. But on Friday, Trump got more specific, telling a group of CEOs at the White House how ― now that he’s president ― he is, in fact, using his authority to help his friends.

“We expect to be cutting a lot out of Dodd-Frank, because frankly, I have so many people, friends of mine, that have nice businesses and they can’t borrow money,” Trump said. “They just can’t get any money, because the banks just won’t let them borrow, because of the rules and regulations in Dodd-Frank.”

The landmark consumer protection bill known as the Dodd-Frank Act was passed in response to the 2008 financial crisis. It requires the nation’s biggest banks to submit to greater scrutiny, and to keep enough capital on hand to make sure taxpayers never again have to cover the institutions’ losses. Banks have complained for years that the new capital requirements and stress tests make it impossible for them to lend as much money as they’d like to.

Trump was speaking at a meeting of the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum, a group of 18 business leaders who have agreed to advise the president on economic issues. The group is chaired by Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman, and includes chief executives from many of the nation’s largest companies, among them Walmart, Boeing, IBM and PepsiCo.

After brief remarks from Schwarzman, Trump told an extraordinary story about how he’d tried to get spots for his friends on the prestigious forum, but Schwarzman told the president that his friends were, essentially, too sleazy to appoint to the group.

“So many people who are friends of mine, in big business, they wanted to be on the committee. And I’d call Steve and say, ‘Steve, can we get so-and-so [on the committee]?’” Trump said.

“’Nope, we’ve got enough,’” the president said Schwarzman would tell him.

“Every once in a while, I’d call and say, ‘How about this one?’” Trump went on. “[And Schwarzman would say,] ‘No, Donald, he’s a corporate raider. These people don’t want to be sitting [on the president’s committee] with corporate raiders.’”

The group laughed nervously.

“Five raiders that wanted to come on here,” Trump boasted, before pointing to Schwarzman. “But he’s been very, very selective.”

With that, the group began introducing themselves around the table.

The anecdote was fascinating in that it offered a window on two different aspects of Trump’s presidency. The first is the former real estate developer’s willingness, as president of the United States, to do favors for his friends, and his apparent lack of qualms about appointing his “corporate raider” buddies to a presidential commission.

The other interesting element of Trump’s story was that Schwarzman evidently overruled him by arguing that Trump’s commission would lose prestige if the president named people to it who’d made their fortunes in controversial ways.

Schwarzman was right, but Trump is known to have very little patience for people who tell him “no.” However, it seems that when Schwarzman framed it as a question of prestige, Trump acquiesced.

Mind you, Schwarzman didn’t say that the advice Trump would receive from the CEOs would be any less valuable if there were a junk bond king sitting on the panel. Or even that the press might ask questions about why someone with a questionable business background, and a close friendship with Trump, was sitting next to the CEO of Walmart. No, it was all about how such a move would look to the kind of people Trump hoped to have on his panel.

As Trump continues to seek out qualified people for his administration, his friends are likely to stay on the front burner. Chances are, it will be up to his staff, and informal advisers like Schwarzman, to draw the line for the president.

Earlier this week, Miami real estate tycoon Jorge Perez recounted how Trump recently sent him an email with plans for the administration’s notorious border wall with Mexico. Perez has worked with Trump to build Trump-branded towers in Florida for years. Now the president was asking Perez if he’d like to be part of the official effort to build the wall.

Perez declined the offer, telling Bloomberg News, “The wall is the most idiotic thing I’ve ever seen or heard in my life.”

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

3
Feb

Sandra Boynton’s Facebook Illustrations Are What We Need Right Now

Children’s book author and illustrator Sandra Boynton is the creator of more than 50 beloved books for kids, including “Moo, Baa, La! La! La!,” “But Not The Hippopotamus” and “The Going To Bed Book.”

Her style is silly and a little absurd, and her books feature lots of stylized hippos, cows and other animals. 

Boynton also posts regular illustrations on her Facebook page  for her followers, often coinciding with holidays and other notable dates, like Groundhog Day, National Pie Day and even Squirrel Appreciation Day. But lately, some of her work has started to seem extra relevant, as the political climate becomes increasingly concerning for many. 

On January 22nd, Boynton posted a cartoon showing a group of mice tilting a teeter-totter with an elephant on the other side, with the caption “Difficult things can be accomplished given enough enthusiasm, joy, and purpose.” It was the day after the Women’s March on Washington, and many commenters noted the parallels between the illustration and how they’d felt marching the day before.

But not everyone was happy. A few protested the “politicization” of Boynton’s work, like the commenter who wrote, “The one thing i never thought i would see is ms. boynton’s cartoons being politicized. the last bastion of humor in a scary world is dead.”

And on January 28th, Boynton posted an illustration of the Earth along with the words “Handle With Care.” Under a political regime that questions the validity and importance of climate change, and posted just a few days after EPA scientists were delivered a gag order, some of her followers interpreted this as a political statement. 

Some agreed with the presumed political message, commenting things like “This needs to go straight to D.C.” and mentioning President Donald Trump. 

Others spoke out against the drawing, with comments like, “Please don’t get political. I have been reading your books to my kids and grandkids for decades. Don’t ruin it.”

But Boynton told The Huffington Post she isn’t making a change into more political work. 

“I think there’s a definite through-line in my nearly 3,217 years of work, so my recent Facebook postings are not essentially different than what I’ve done all along. In fact, many of these postings use drawings from long ago, some as far back as the 70s. Their recent timing is not haphazard, of course, but I’m pretty surprised by the wildfire of response ― mostly positive and grateful, and some corrosive and mean,” she said.

Boynton says also of the recent interpretation of her work, “I’m puzzled by the idea that I’m suddenly ‘political.’ Ethics are not political. They’re ethics. And in these unsettled and unsettling times, silence is surely just as ‘political’ as non-silence. My work is my work—wry, upbeat, quirky. And it’s uncontroversial, except if you’re adamantly opposed to kindness and/or hippos.” 

Either way, her work, with its themes of positivity, coming together to achieve great things and kindness are providing solace to many, like the commenter who wrote: “Sandra, you have no idea how much this helped today…I look at your work and it cheers me and makes me feel better. THANK YOU.”

When asked what overall message she hopes to send with her art and her social media presence, Boynton responds in her trademark quirky fashion: “Have fun. Love each other’s company. Think. Find joy. Find stillness. Sing, dance. Pout if you want to. Don’t share your chocolate unless you feel you absolutely must.”

Below, some more of the inspiring illustrations Boynton has shared on Facebook since Election Day.

– This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2017/02/01/sandra-boynton-facebook-illustrations-are-not-political_n_14598030.html